Tag Archives: Just like the bakery

Brioche Nanterre

Yet another brioche recipe (you have one here, here, there and again there). But this one is THE brioche I will make again and again because it has the texture I have always been looking for!  This brioche is as light as a feather with a soft airy and stringy inside and a crisp thin crust outside. Just like at the bakery! I owe this recipe to Puce bleue from J’en reprendrai bien un bout and the secret of this fabulous texture is the flour type: instead of using strong white flour (or bread flour) as I usually do for breads, this recipe states to use Type 45 flour (French category of flour), which is known here as the Type 00 or Pizza/pasta flour. The reason behind it is because this flour is made with soft wheat grain and is the finest flour of all. Its gluten content is not as high as bread flour but the texture of breads made with it is softer with a crispier crust. The other secret behind this brioche is the long rise in the fridge (12 hours), which allows the yeast to develop slowly, enhancing again the texture of the brioche. Use good quality butter for making this as margarine or butter substitute will never render the same richness and taste to the brioche as real butter does.

BriocheNanterreColl

Source: J’en reprendrai bien un bout

Ingredients
For 6 people

280g pasta flour (type 00 or pizza flour) – if substituting with bread flour, only use 250g as it absorbs more water than type 00.
1tsp sea salt
35g caster sugar
10g fresh yeast or 5g dried fast action yeast
1tbsp milk
150g eggs (about 3 eggs)
125g unsalted butter, diced
Eggwash (1 egg  beaten with 1tbsp milk)

Method

  1. Thermomix: place in that order: the milk, yeast, flour, salt & sugar and eggs in the TM bowl making sure the yeast doesn’t come in contact directly with the salt or sugar. Mix 3 min/37C/speed 3.
  2. Add the butter, program 5 min, turn the dial to locked lid position and press the kneading button. Go to step 6.
  3. Non Thermomix: warm the milk until luke warm (make sure it is tepid as too hot milk would kill the yeast) and mix in the yeast.
  4. Place the flour, sugar, salt in a bowl, mix and make a well. Crack the eggs inside the well, add the yeast mixture and knead in the bowl for 5 minutes (or use a stand mixer with the flat beater). The dough will be quite soft and sticky, which is normal.
  5. Add the butter and knead again for 15 minutes (stand mixer: use the dough hook) until the dough comes out of the sides of the bowl and is soft and as smooth as a baby’s bottom.
  6. Tip out the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave to rise for 2 hours (I use the oven heated for 1min to 50C then turned off to rise my dough).
  7. Punch down the dough and knead for a few seconds to give it back its initial volume.
  8. Cover with cling film and place in the fridge for 12 hours.
  9. Take out the dough and leave at room temperature for 15 minutes before punching it down and kneading it again. Fold the dough a few times over itself, lift it and let it fall sharply on the worktop. Repeat 2 or 3 times. This step is important to get the gluten  working and the dough will become more elastic.
  10. Weigh your dough (mine was 630g) and divide in 6 equal balls (I had 6 balls of about 105g each).
  11. Arrange side by side in a rectangular dish (I used a heart shaped silicone dish) and leave to rise, covered for 2 hours.
  12. Preheat the oven to 180C (if the dough was rising in the oven, take it out first!).
  13. Brush the dough with the eggwash and bake for 30 min. Eat soon after baking as it is when it’s at its best!

Orchidee_001Spring is still shy but at last we have had a few flowers growing and amazingly these Orchids blossomed again after a long winter!